Telegraph and things

Up until 1866 it took approximately 10 days to send a message across the Atlantic. Why did it take that long you ask? Because that’s how long it took for a boat to sail the distance to deliver the message. For anyone born after the telegraph and the following tech advancements it’s difficult to understand a world before global communication. Today we are so accustom to getting a message that was typed 1.5 seconds ago! And when we don’t get that instantaneous reply, we get annoyed. The first transatlantic telegraph cable, however was the initial development that enabled messages to be sent in a matter of minutes, dramatically changing the history of transatlantic communication. This global communication system often described as a type of nervous system is suggestive of the way in which matter (information) is consciously and continually produced, contributing to the adaption of the changing communication landscape we are experiencing currently.

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2 thoughts on “Telegraph and things

  1. Hi Annabelle,
    Your meme really corresponded with my emotions whilst listening to Teds lecture. I feel my life would have been an unorganised mess living during that era! Your argument is clear and consistent with the weekly content. To help further your insights it may have been useful to incorporate more examples and hyperlinks to academic sources such as our weekly readings. Also you may like to consider moving your meme to the top of the page as this may help your article flow even more 🙂
    Good luck with your future studies.
    Serena

  2. Your post was very informative and packed with interesting facts about past means of communication. Including how the global communication system can often be described as a type of nervous system through it consciously and continually producing and contributing to the adaption of the changing communication landscape we are experiencing currently was a great way to highlight the development that enabled messages in faster ways, dramatically changing the history of transatlantic communication.
    Can’t wait to read more!

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